Leaving the Nest

Leaving the Nest: Daniel Volkmann

We are extremely proud of our graduating fencers, and will be introducing them over the next several weeks. If you see them, wish them well in their future endeavors! Daniel Volkmann Daniel began fencing at nine years old, after taking a run at several other sports. Traditional sports were problematic because he was lanky and uncoordinated. He started with saber at HDFA in Reno; after a year of placing nearly dead last in every RYC, he picked up an epee. Quickly, he found success (thank you, lanky stature). After five years of fencing at HDFA, Daniel and his mother moved to NWFC to fence under Cody Mattern. Even as many of his friends depart, he'll continue to be thankful for his Northwest family, and is excited to work toward higher levels of coaching certifications.
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Why Fencing Beginners
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NWFC Youth Camps: Why Fencing?

Coach Vince is hosting 4 amazing youth fencing camps for beginners this summer. Let him tell you more about his camps: Beginner Youth Camp Our beginner camps are geared toward kids who have never fenced, but love to play with swords. In our camps, kids ages 7-13 learn foil fencing through fun games and activities. We never forget that play is a key element in the learning process. Why Fencing? Fencing is a sport practiced worldwide and one of the oldest Olympic sports. Fencing not only develops overall physical fitness, but it also fosters critical thinking, self-discipline, and self-esteem. And, unlike many other sports, fencing is a life-long pursuit. We have many parents who decided to start fencing after watching their son or daughter fence. Safety Taught by USFCA Fencing Master Vince Camillo, who has been leading youth classes at NWFC since 2014. All NWFC staff are Safeport certified. We
NWFC: Andy Faubert
Leaving the Nest

Leaving the Nest: Andy Faubert

We are extremely proud of our graduating fencers, and will be introducing them over the next several weeks. If you see them, wish them well in their future endeavors! Andy Faubert At age 12, Andy started practicing foil at a small club operating out of Las Positas community college in California. He switched to epee after finding success in the Y14 circuit due to his early 5'9" stature and foil ill-suited style. An extended school break by his club led him to fence at East Bay Fencers Gym, where he learned to fleche. Fast-forward to age 16, Andy moved up with his family to Vancouver, WA where he fences with the NWFC team full-time. Besides fencing, Andy writes on Quora, reads books, programs, and dreams up better designs of fencing gear.
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Parent Tips

How do I get good at this? Every student or parent has asked this question.

By Michael McTigue Assistant Épée Coach How do I get good at this? Every student or parent has asked this question. It’s an obvious question, and the answer isn’t obvious or we wouldn’t be asking it. Learning fencing is like a 3-legged stool, one leg is group instruction and bouting with your friends, another leg is the private lesson, and lastly there is competition. All three are important to the growth of the student and the omission of any one of them will limit their development. Inside each there lies a richness of experiences and opportunities for growth. Today’s focus is on the private lesson component. First off what is it? At NWFC it is a 30-minute block of time that the student spends one on one with their coach. In the beginning this time is spent teaching the critical technical skills, the building blocks of fencing. This creates the